Modern Japanese literature in western translations
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Modern Japanese literature in western translations a bibliography. by Kokusai Bunka Kaikan, Tokyo. Toshoshitsu.

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Published by International House of Japan Library in Tokyo .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Japanese literature -- Translations into foreign languages -- Bibliography.,
  • Literature, Modern -- Translations from Japanese -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ3308.T7
The Physical Object
Pagination190 p. ;
Number of Pages190
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18946599M

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Sugita Genpaku (–) was a Japanese scholar known for his translation of Kaitai Shinsho (New Book of Anatomy) from the Dutch-language anatomy book Ontleedkundige Tafelen. As a full-blown translation from a Western language, it was the first of its kind in Japan.   In Studies in Modern Japanese Literature, twenty-two students honor their mentor, Edwin McClellan, with essays and translations focusing on literature from the late nineteenth through the late twentieth authors discussed range from Natsume Sôseki to Murakami Haruki, and the subjects that are dealt with include the flourishing of literary forms in response to the Ansei 5/5(1).   In the forward, the book’s editor, Ivan Morris, who translated some of the stories, provides a brief Japanese history from the Meiji Era, when the Western form of literature . The fourth book in a multivolume history of modern Japanese literature by one of the world's most accomplished translators and scholars of Japanese culture and literature, this volume offers unparalleled insight into Japanese poetry, drama, and criticism.

University Professor Emeritus of Japanese, Columbia University. Despite the great difficulties arising from such idiosyncrasies of style, Japanese literature of all periods is exceptionally appealing to modern readers, whether read in the original or in translation. Because it is prevailingly. Traditional Japanese Literature features a rich array of works dating from the very beginnings of the Japanese written language through the evolution of Japan's noted aristocratic court and warrior cultures. It contains stunning new translations of such canonical texts as The Tales of the Heike as well as works and genres previously ignored by scholars and unknown to general readers.   Seidensticker can sound too cut-and-dried, while Washburn errs on the side of wordiness. Indeed, Tanizaki stated that he was inspired by Waley’s translation to write his own modern Japanese . stars Reading these excerpts is worth spending my time since it's like reading an overview of modern Japanese literature from onwards by 15+1 translators. Only two are quite familiar to me, that is, Donald Keene and Edward Seidensticker. As for the rest, it is my first time to enjoy reading their fine translations.4/5(21).

  Modern Japanese Literature in Translation: a Bibliography. Compiled by the International House of Japan Library. Kōdansha International, Call# Z L5 K66 , East Asia Library Reference. Literature Prior to For premodern Japanese literature, consult this list of translations from classical Japanese up to compiled by Michael.   Traditional Japanese Literature features a rich array of works dating from the very beginnings of the Japanese written language through the evolution of Japan's noted aristocratic court and warrior cultures. It contains stunning new translations of such canonical texts as The Tales of the Heike as well as works and genres previously ignored by scholars and unknown to general s: A good book can overcome many barriers in its quest to find an audience, but the Pacific Ocean apparently isn’t one of them. This is the case for Japanese literature, which defies differences in language, culture, and politics to attain readership throughout Asia, but has yet to find a foothold in. This bibliography provides an overview for finding when Western literature was translated into Japanese during the Meiji Period. Many of the sources listed include reprints of the work or provide the information necessary for finding copies of the works using traditional bibliography sources, such as the National Diet Library.